How Long Can Embryos Stay Frozen?

On November 25, 2017, Tina Gibson, a woman in Tennessee gave birth to her daughter, Emma, who had spent 24 years as a frozen embryo.  This is the longest-frozen embryo to successfully come to birth.  Emma weighed 6 lbs. 8 oz. when she was born and is a thriving newborn.

Emma had initially been conceived via in vitro fertilization and …

Sleep May Affect IVF Success

A new study is showing that lack of good quality sleep may affect a woman’s chance of successfully conceiving with assisted reproductive technology.  This study was presented at the 2017 American Society of Reproductive Medicine annual Congress and showed that women with poor sleep quality undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) had lower fertilization rates than women with better sleep quality.…

Vitamin D May Affect Fertility Treatment Success

A new study published in the journal Human Reproduction found that there is a relationship between vitamin D levels and fertility treatment success rates from assisted reproductive technology.  The researchers concluded that women with sufficient levels of vitamin D have higher live birth rates after undergoing fertility treatment with assisted reproductive technology than women with low vitamin D levels.…

More Traffic=Lower IVF Success

Just what we didn’t need: another thing to worry about. We try to increase our chance of success conceiving by improving our general health before trying to conceive. Men and woman stop smoking and recreational drugs, eat right, take vitamins and exercise regularly. But now we also have to worry about the traffic?

The probability of implantation and live birth …

A Defense of PGS

An article recently published in The Cut column of New York Magazine has captured the attention of the fertility and genetic testing community. Titled “A New Last Chance”, the article questioned the utility of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) – a technique which data from the CDC and SART, along with the results of several randomized controlled trials (RCTs), have all …

Pesticides in Food May Reduce Fertility

A new study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine is showing that women who eat foods with high amounts of pesticide residue may have reduced fertility.  The study looked at 325 women undergoing infertility treatment with assisted reproductive technology (ART). Intake of high-pesticide residue fruits and vegetables was associated with a lower likelihood of having child via ART.   Intake …

Genetic Testing of Embryos May Cause Ethical Dilemma

There is an emerging ethical morass in the field of reproductive medicine: what to do when patients seeking to get pregnant select embryos with DNA that could lead to a disease or disability. Should clinicians’ desire to help their patients have children override concerns about possibly doing harm to those children? And what about cases in which patients end up …

Red Wine May Boost Fertility

A new study being presented at the 2017 American Society of Reproductive Medicine annual Congress is suggesting that drinking red wine may boost fertility.  Researchers from Washington University found that women who drank more than 5 glasses of red wine per month had greater ovarian reserve than women who drank less than 5 glasses of red wine per month.

135 …

Fertility Business Booming. Why?

According to an article in the Washington Post, the multibillion-dollar fertility industry is booming, and experimenting with business models that are changing the American family in new and unpredictable ways. Would-be parents seeking donor eggs and sperm can pick and choose from long checklists of physical and intellectual characteristics. Clinics now offer volume discounts, package deals and 100 percent guarantees …