Miscarriage Myths

I recently blogged here about new information related to miscarriage: that smog can increase the risk of miscarriage and that it is no longer generally thought that one needs to wait to try to conceive after a miscarriage. This is a policy that we have followed for some time; not new to us.

Now in an article in Self, …

New Pregnancy Risks: Smog and Heat

Just when you thought there was nothing more to worry about, two new studies reveal two new concerns: smog may increase the chance of a miscarriage and global warming may be associated with a higher risk of premature births, stillbirths, or other negative pregnancy outcomes.

# 1: Smog might raise a woman’s risk of miscarriage early in her pregnancy, a …

No Wait After Miscarriage

It was traditional to tell patients to wait three months after a miscarriage before trying to conceive. There was no scientific evidence that the wait was beneficial and for a long time I have been telling patients that they can try to conceive after their first period following the miscarriage. After the emotional disappointment from a miscarriage it’s very difficult …

More Traffic=Lower IVF Success

Just what we didn’t need: another thing to worry about. We try to increase our chance of success conceiving by improving our general health before trying to conceive. Men and woman stop smoking and recreational drugs, eat right, take vitamins and exercise regularly. But now we also have to worry about the traffic?

The probability of implantation and live birth …

A Defense of PGS

An article recently published in The Cut column of New York Magazine has captured the attention of the fertility and genetic testing community. Titled “A New Last Chance”, the article questioned the utility of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) – a technique which data from the CDC and SART, along with the results of several randomized controlled trials (RCTs), have all …

Genetic Testing of Embryos May Cause Ethical Dilemma

There is an emerging ethical morass in the field of reproductive medicine: what to do when patients seeking to get pregnant select embryos with DNA that could lead to a disease or disability. Should clinicians’ desire to help their patients have children override concerns about possibly doing harm to those children? And what about cases in which patients end up …

Fertility Business Booming. Why?

According to an article in the Washington Post, the multibillion-dollar fertility industry is booming, and experimenting with business models that are changing the American family in new and unpredictable ways. Would-be parents seeking donor eggs and sperm can pick and choose from long checklists of physical and intellectual characteristics. Clinics now offer volume discounts, package deals and 100 percent guarantees …

Cancer Patients Unaware of Fertility Options

Now that cancer treatments help many more cancer victims to become cancer survivors it is important to consider life issues when planning cancer treatments. For younger cancer patients, future fertility is an important life issue.

Yet, up to half of cancer patients of reproductive age do not receive adequate information about the impact of treatment on their fertility, decreasing their …

Low ovarian reserve in older women

We always worry when a patient in her late 30’s or early 40’s has biomarkers such as early-follicular-phase serum antimullerian hormone (AMH), serum and urinary follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and serum inhibin B indicating a low ovarian reserve. But for some a new study indicates that low ovarian reserve may not indicate a problem conceiving.

Lab tests showing that women have …