How Smoking and Drinking Affect Male Fertility

There are many lifestyle factors that can affect male fertility, including smoking and drinking.  Identifying some of these modifiable risk factors can be important for couples, since male infertility plays a role for over one-third of couples who are struggling to conceive.

A review of how smoking and drinking can affect male fertility was recently presented online at UrologyTimes.com by …

How Sexually Transmitted Infections Affect Fertility

There are many lifestyle factors and medical conditions that can affect a person’s fertility, including having had a sexually transmitted infection in the past.  When trying to conceive, most people aren’t thinking about the sexually transmitted infection they had years ago, but that infection may have impacted their fertility potential.  Infections, such as gonorrhea, chlamydia, HIV, and herpes have all …

IVF Can Help Eliminate Inherited Diseases

When most people think about in vitro fertilization (IVF), they think of its use as a treatment for infertility.  IVF can also be used to treat non-infertility conditions though.  A growing space for the use of IVF is to use it as a treatment to reduce or eliminate inherited diseases from a family’s blood line.

Eliminating the risk of passing …

Michelle Obama Opens up about IVF and Miscarriage

At the top of the news headlines this week are stories about former first lady, Michelle Obama, opening up about miscarriage and needing in vitro fertilization (IVF) to conceive her daughters, Sasha and Malia Obama.

In her memoir, “Becoming,” she discusses the personal struggles she faced when trying to start a family. In an interview with Good Morning America, she …

Prediabetes May Affect Male Fertility

A new study is providing more evidence that a man’s general health can affect his sperm quality.   The study, published in BJU International, found that infertile men with prediabetes have altered hormone levels and increased sperm DNA fragmentation compared to infertile men without prediabetes.

Researchers from the University Vita Salute San Raffaele in Milan, Italy, examined 744 men with …

Does Stress Affect Fertility?

A new study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, found that higher levels of stress may be associated with a lower chance of conceiving a pregnancy for women.

Researchers from Boston University School of Public Health used data the Pregnancy Study Online (PRESTO), an ongoing preconception study that follows couples in North America for 12 months or until …

African American Women May Have Lower IVF Success

Several studies presented at the American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) 2018 annual Scientific Congress and Expo in Denver, Colorado, showed that African American Women may have lower in vitro fertilization (IVF) success rates than other races.

One study looked at the success rates of IVF procedures at a large Washington, DC area fertility center.  They compared the results of …

Sleep is Important for Fertility

A new study presented at the American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) 2018 annual Scientific Congress and Expo in Denver, Colorado, highlighted the importance of sleep on fertility.  The prospective cohort study showed that women with regular bedtimes took less time to conceive a pregnancy than women with more erratic bedtimes.

The study was undertaken by researchers from Washington University …

Does Diet Affect Sperm Quality?

Multiple recent studies have shown a decline in men’s sperm concentration and total sperm count over the past 80 years, but the underlying cause of this downward trend is unclear.  Most likely, there are multiple factors contributing to this trend, including worsening diets and an increasing number of men with obesity.

A recent review in the journal Fertility and Sterility …

Advances in Male Fertility Testing

A new test developed by Androvia LifeSciences, called a Cap-Score, may help predict whether or not a man’s sperm is able to fertilize an egg.  The Cap-Score was developed by the Travis lab at the Baker Institute for Animal Health and Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, who recently published their Cap-Score data in the journal Molecular Reproduction and Development