New Guidelines for Men with Zika Exposure

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have updated their recommendations for men trying to conceive with possible Zika virus exposure. Previously men were advised to wait 6 months after possible Zika virus exposure to try to conceive.  The CDC released updated guidelines on August 7, 2018, dropping that waiting period to 3 months.  During that 3 month …

How Much Do Young Adults Really Know About Fertility?

Although most people know that fertility declines with age, a new study shows that many young adults don’t have a clear understanding of what age it actually becomes harder to get pregnant.

Researchers in Australia surveyed 1,215 university students with a 34-item online questionnaire regarding their expectations for future parenthood and their fertility knowledge.  Of the students surveyed, only 46 …

Happy 40th Birthday, IVF!

The world’s first in vitro fertilization (IVF) baby, Louise Joy Brown, was born in 1978 in the U.K.  Since then, approximately 8 million babies have been born world-wide as a result of IVF.  In the United States alone, approximately 1.5-2 percent of all babies born these days are conceived via IVF.

In the past 40 years, since the conception and …

Moderate Alcohol Consumption May Improve Male Fertility

The question about whether or not alcohol consumption affects male fertility is difficult to answer because the medical literature in this area has been mixed.  A new study from Italy, published in the journal Andrology, is suggesting that a moderate amount of alcohol by men may actually boost male fertility.

The study looked at the semen analyses of 323 …

Does Endometrial Scratching Improve Pregnancy Rates?

A new study, presented at the 2018 annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology, suggests that endometrial scratching may not be as efficacious in improving implantation rates as was once thought.

Endometrial scratching is a procedure that is often performed prior to in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo transfer in an attempt to improve pregnancy rates.  …

Do Fertility Drugs Cause Ovarian Cancer?

A new study, presented on July 3rd at the 2018 annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE), provides more evidence to confirm that fertility drugs do not increase a woman’s risk of developing ovarian cancer.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 58,000 women in Denmark, who underwent fertility treatment with assisted reproductive technology (ART) between …

Mosaic Embryos Can Lead to Healthy Babies

A recent study published in the journal Fertility & Sterility gives us more information about the chance of having a healthy child after transferring a mosaic embryo.  The study was able to show that mosaic embryos can result in the delivery of healthy babies and the extent of mosaicism may influence this chance.

The study looked at 77 women, who …

NSAIDs May Increase Risk of Miscarriage

A new study, published in the journal American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, shows that using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, around the time of conception and in pregnancy may increase the risk of early miscarriage.

The study was conducted at Kaiser Permanente Northern California and included over 1,000 pregnant women.  Researcher followed 241 women who took …

Tuberculosis Can Affect Ovarian Reserve

A new study published in the journal, Human Reproduction, shows that latent genital tuberculosis (TB) can cause a decline in a woman’s egg count.  While other studies have shown a that genital tuberculosis can cause tubal and uterine factor infertility, this is the first study to show a relationship between latent tuberculosis and low egg reserve.

The study was …

Vitamin D May Reduce Miscarriage Risk

A new study published online in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology reports that having adequate Vitamin D levels may reduce miscarriage risk.  The study found that women who had previously had a miscarriage were more likely to get pregnant and have a baby if they had sufficient Vitamin D levels.

The study included 1,200 women with a history of miscarriage. …