Low ovarian reserve in older women

We always worry when a patient in her late 30’s or early 40’s has biomarkers such as early-follicular-phase serum antimullerian hormone (AMH), serum and urinary follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and serum inhibin B indicating a low ovarian reserve. But for some a new study indicates that low ovarian reserve may not indicate a problem conceiving.

Lab tests showing that women have …

Older Moms May Live Longer

A new study shows that women who start having children later in life may live longer.  This study, which was recently published in the American Journal of Public Health, showed that women who were older than 25 when they first gave birth were 11% more likely to live to age 90.  Over 20,000 women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative …

OB/GYN describes her struggle with infertility at age 42

Here’s an interesting perspective on one person’s struggle with infertility: an OB/GYN.

In a blog post in the Washington Post maternal-fetal medicine specialist Dr. Shannon M. Clark laments that she did not start sooner and describes her experience at the 42 to try to have a baby.

“As an obstetrician-gynecologist who specializes in the care of high-risk women, I see …

More Women Are Freezing Their Eggs. Should They?

In 2012, the American Society for Reproductive Medicine decided egg freezing was no longer an experimental procedure. That opened the door for clinics to market it to women who don’t have a medical reason to do it but are simply worried about their declining fertility — what’s being dubbed as “social” egg freezing.

John Robertson, a professor of law and …

Good results from egg donors over 35

According to an article on Healthday, results of in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles using eggs from older donors are as good as those using eggs from younger women, a new study finds.

Because egg quality declines with age, most IVF centers only accept eggs from donors younger than 35, says Resolve, the National Infertility Association, based in McLean, Va.…

Fertility Math: Is it news that age matters?

A new study presented recently at the American Society of Reproductive Medicine’s (ASRM) annual conference has found that by age 38, the chances of conceiving begin to drop dramatically. And by age 43, it is 10 times more difficult to get pregnant than it is at 37.

The researchers analyzed data from nearly 200 women to learn how many eggs, …