Air Pollution May Cause Poor Sperm Quality

A new study published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine, is suggesting that air pollution may be linked to poorer sperm quality.  The study showed that exposure to fine particulate matter air pollution is associated with a lower level of sperm normal morphology.

The study looked at the sperm concentration, motility, and morphology of approximately 6500 men, ages 15 …

New Pregnancy Risks: Smog and Heat

Just when you thought there was nothing more to worry about, two new studies reveal two new concerns: smog may increase the chance of a miscarriage and global warming may be associated with a higher risk of premature births, stillbirths, or other negative pregnancy outcomes.

# 1: Smog might raise a woman’s risk of miscarriage early in her pregnancy, a …

Vitamin D May Affect Fertility Treatment Success

A new study published in the journal Human Reproduction found that there is a relationship between vitamin D levels and fertility treatment success rates from assisted reproductive technology.  The researchers concluded that women with sufficient levels of vitamin D have higher live birth rates after undergoing fertility treatment with assisted reproductive technology than women with low vitamin D levels.…

No Wait After Miscarriage

It was traditional to tell patients to wait three months after a miscarriage before trying to conceive. There was no scientific evidence that the wait was beneficial and for a long time I have been telling patients that they can try to conceive after their first period following the miscarriage. After the emotional disappointment from a miscarriage it’s very difficult …

More Traffic=Lower IVF Success

Just what we didn’t need: another thing to worry about. We try to increase our chance of success conceiving by improving our general health before trying to conceive. Men and woman stop smoking and recreational drugs, eat right, take vitamins and exercise regularly. But now we also have to worry about the traffic?

The probability of implantation and live birth …

Sexually Transmitted Infections Affect Fertility

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), untreated sexually transmitted infections (STIs) cause infertility in at least 24,000 women in the United States every year.  The most common STIs to cause infertility include chlamydia and gonorrhea, but other STIs have also been implicated. The CDC estimates that there are 2.86 million new cases of chlamydia and 820,000 new cases …

A Defense of PGS

An article recently published in The Cut column of New York Magazine has captured the attention of the fertility and genetic testing community. Titled “A New Last Chance”, the article questioned the utility of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) – a technique which data from the CDC and SART, along with the results of several randomized controlled trials (RCTs), have all …

Pesticides in Food May Reduce Fertility

A new study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine is showing that women who eat foods with high amounts of pesticide residue may have reduced fertility.  The study looked at 325 women undergoing infertility treatment with assisted reproductive technology (ART). Intake of high-pesticide residue fruits and vegetables was associated with a lower likelihood of having child via ART.   Intake …

Yoga May Boost Fertility

Two new research studies, presented at the 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine annual Scientific Congress, suggest that doing yoga may enhance fertility.  The research showed that infertility patients who did yoga had reduced stress and anxiety levels and higher pregnancy rates.

One study from New Delhi looked at pregnancy rates for women who previously had an unsuccessful IVF cycle.  …